Shirley Jennifer Lim



Associate Professor (Ph.D., UCLA, 1998)
E-Mail
graddirectorhistory@stonybrook.edu
Curriculum Vitae
Office
SBS N 327
Phone
Research Interests
I focus on how Japanese American, Chinese American, and Filipina American women used movies, magazines, sorority membership, and beauty pageants to create an Americanized middle-class identity during an era of racial segregation and immigration exclusion.
Scholarly Works
                                                                                               

Book:

A Feeling of Belonging: Asian American Women's Public Culture, 1930-1960

(New York:New YorkUniversityPress, 2006).

 

Articles:

“’The Most Beautiful Chinese Girl in the World’: Anna May Wong’s Global Cinematic Modernity,” in Body and Nation: The Global Realms of U.S. Body Politics in the Twentieth Century, eds. Emily Rosenberg and Shanon Fitzpatrick (Durham: Duke University Press, 2014).

 

“’Speaking German Like Nobody’s Business’: Anna May Wong, Walter Benjamin, and the Possibilities of Asian American Cosmopolitanism,” Journal of Transnational American Studies (Summer 2012).

 

“’Glamorising Racial Modernity,” in Australia’s Asia: From Yellow Peril to Asian Century, eds. David Walker and Agnieszka Sobocinska (Perth:University ofWestern Australia Press, 2012).

 

“Asian American Youth Culture,” Journal of Asian American Studies 11 (2008).

 

“Hell’s A Poppin’: Asian American Women’s Youth Consumer Culture,” in Asian American Youth Culture, eds. Min Zhou and Jennifer Lee (New York: Routledge, 2004).

 

“Contested Beauty: Asian American Women’s Citizenship During the Early Cold War,” in Asian Pacific American Women’s History, eds. Shirley Hune and Gail Nomura (New York: New York University Press, 2003).

 

Reprint: “Contested Beauty: Asian American Beauty Culture during the Cold War,” excerpt from A Feeling of Belonging: Asian American Women’s Public Culture, 1930-1960 (New York University Press, 2006) 121-153. Reprinted in Asian American Feminisms volumes I-IV, ed. Leslie Bow (London and New York: Routledge, 2012).